Two Thumbs Up for Employer Branding

Summer movie season is upon us, and with it comes a wave of movie trailers designed to get us to hand over our hard-earned cash to see Iron Man, the U.S.S. Enterprise, and Superman soar across the big screen.

But how many of us have whetted our appetites for a film based on its knockout trailer, only to discover that all the best parts were in the trailer?

The interview process is really showcasing “your best side” on both sides of the fence. Wanting what you don’t have is somewhat an inherent human condition. Combining these elements in the interview process leads to a steady stream of disappointment. We believe providing candidates with complete, objective data before and during the interview process is critical. This should include a company overview, complete with goals and identified market segments, as well as a “day in the life” of specific jobs (especially roles that suffer higher turnover) which can showcase the responsibilities of the position, the company’s culture, and the immediate workplace environment.

What’s unappealing to one candidate may be completely exciting to the next. Organizations can actually kill two birds with one stone – attracting the excited folks and not wasting time and money with the others. If the job opportunity requires relocation, provide a full introduction to the community.  Relocations are tough and expensive, so employers should be thorough and not hide any details. And, of course, make sure that candidates meet the hiring manager! This is the person they will work most closely with – a sneak peek is essential to help build rapport.

The dangers of missed expectations are obvious: lost time and wasted money. If that’s not enough, top candidates will no longer tolerate an aggravating new-hire process. Worse, according to a recent report by HR consulting firm Development Dimensions International, over half the employees surveyed had already become disenchanted with jobs they took in 2012.

The report – which studied 2,300 newly hired workers and 250 staffing directors in 28 countries – found that 51 percent of new employees hired in 2012 have “buyer’s remorse” and 88 percent were looking to make a change. Their chief complaint: The hiring process failed to paint a realistic or accurate picture of the job.

How can an employer prevent new hire remorse? Enter video (you knew it was coming).

A branding portal such as InterviewStream’s new “About Us” lets employers upload custom videos about the company, the community, the position, and a typical day in the life of an employee. Candidates gain a sense of the company’s history and culture, as well as the good and bad qualities of the job, before they commit to an interview.
Organizations that clearly illustrate and define a job before an employee says “I do” will not only benefit from filling a position . . . they may discover their new employees are genuine game-changers, the people who are living their passions and driving the organization to a higher level!

Recent Posts

Leave a Comment